ACT - The Association of Christian Teachers

for Christians working in education

The week
News items from the week’s daily and education press, covering the major education news stories of the week.

Teachers Prayer Diary - March

Teachers Prayer Diary March  2018

 

Thur

1st

For school staff   as they plan a new year

Fri

2nd

For all those   starting work in a new school this term

Sat

3rd

For all pupils   starting a new school this term

Sun

4th

For refugees in   school

Mon

5th

For all those   children excluded from school

Tues

6th

For sensitive   handling of the Transgender issue in schools

Wed

7th

For Barbara Bell   – ACT Chair of Trustees

Thur

8th

For all   Christians training to teach

Fri

9th

For Angela   Raynor – Shadow Education Secretary

Sat

10th

For all involved   in home schooling

Sun

11th

I pray for   ……………… a teacher I know

Mon

12th

For the Consultation   on Relationships and Sex Education

Tues

13th

For pupils with   additional needs in our schools

Wed

14th

For continued   media opportunities for ACT

Thur

15th

For Justine   Greening – Education Secretary

Fri

16th

For school   chaplains and their ministry

Sat

17th

For your local   FE college

Sun

18th

For our   ‘Overseas’ Trustee Jamie Jamieson

Mon

19th

For Christian   Governors in schools

Tues

20th

For those   planning to set up new Christian schools

Wed

21st

For Nick Gibb –   School minister

Thur

22nd

For Christian   teachers living out their faith in schools

Fri

23rd

For your local   University

Sat

24th

For Clive Ireson   – ACT Director

Sun

25th

I pray for ………….    a school I know

Mon

26th

For Prof Trevor   Cooling, Chair of the RE Council

Tues

27th

For travellers   children

Wed

28th

For Christian   School Workers

Thur

29th

For volunteers   taking assemblies in schools

Fri

30th 

For Dawn   Williams, ACT Admin Assistant

Sat

31st

For pupils   struggling in their Christian Witness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Catholics cautious over faith based admissions.

Catholic school leaders are cautious about a new drive to lift the cap on faith-based admissions, after some took a “huge financial risk” and had their “fingers burned” the last time it was promised, Schools Week has learned.

Damian Hinds, the education secretary, pledged to lift the cap – which prevents free schools in areas with a shortage of places from admitting more than 50 per cent of pupils on the basis of faith – in an interview with The Sunday Times last week.

The Catholic Education Service has welcomed the move, and one diocese is poised to build eight new free schools in the east of England as soon as the cap is lifted.

But a source familiar with the situation said some in the church are privately nervous about the news, and won’t act until matters are set in stone.

Read more.


Principal harassed for over a year.

A County Down school principal who was harassed for over a year by a parent of two pupils has described her ordeal as the man responsible was sentenced.

Julie Thomas told a court she was repeatedly verbally abused by the man, who took photos of her outside school and once showed up outside her home.

On another occasion, he allegedly shouted at her: "If this school was run by a man it would be better."

Gerard Knight, of Cayman Drive, Bangor, was given a suspended sentence.

Read more.


Students don't want different price tags for degrees.

More than 60% of students would not back varying price tags for different degree courses, a survey suggests.

Many of the 1,019 students questioned also opposed lower fees for those from poorer backgrounds.

The findings are in a report by the Higher Education Policy Institute which argues that the benefits of varying fees by degree are "largely illusory".

They come days after the prime minister launched a review of tuition fees and university funding.

Overall, 63% of those polled for the study thought that full-time courses should have the same fees.

Meanwhile one in three disagreed with that.

Read more.


Emotions on campus.

Ashley Hayward stands anxiously on the picket line outside the Senate House library in the heart of Bloomsbury, central London.

As cries of: "Don't go to your classes today, don't cross the picket," ring out, the stress tells on the 19-year-old's face.

Edging forward, the first-year ancient-languages student seems distressed and a little angry.

"I completely agree with the lecturers, but I am paying for my education and my teacher is running the lesson today," she says.

"This is my degree. I have an exam. So I can't miss it."

"This is an exam that is 50% of a core module."

Polite-but-persuasive picket Martha, a full-time researcher in neuroscience, tells Ashley: "We are asking students not to go in today. This is about our pensions.

Read more.


Emotions on campus.

Ashley Hayward stands anxiously on the picket line outside the Senate House library in the heart of Bloomsbury, central London.

As cries of: "Don't go to your classes today, don't cross the picket," ring out, the stress tells on the 19-year-old's face.

Edging forward, the first-year ancient-languages student seems distressed and a little angry.

"I completely agree with the lecturers, but I am paying for my education and my teacher is running the lesson today," she says.

"This is my degree. I have an exam. So I can't miss it."

"This is an exam that is 50% of a core module."

Polite-but-persuasive picket Martha, a full-time researcher in neuroscience, tells Ashley: "We are asking students not to go in today. This is about our pensions.

Read more.


Pickets on university campuses.

There have been pickets on campuses as university staff begin a strike in more than 50 universities, in a dispute over pensions.

Lecturers have walked out at universities including Oxford and Cambridge at the beginning of a month-long strike campaign.

Petitions signed by 80,000 students, many backing the lecturers, are demanding refunds for lost teaching.

Universities minister Sam Gyimah has called for more negotiations.

But Mr Gyimah says students "deserve to receive the education that they are paying for. For many, this is a vital time in their studies".

Read more.


National Apprenticeship week soon.

National Apprenticeship Week 2018 - #NAW2018 - takes place from 5 to 9 March 2018. Everyone with a passion for apprenticeships will be coming together to celebrate and get the nation talking about the exciting, and wide ranging, opportunities they have to offer.

 

Now in its 11th year, the theme for 2018 is Apprenticeships Work to highlight the positive impact of apprenticeships for individuals, employers, local communities and the wider economy.

How can you get involved and learn more?

With support from current and former apprentices, employers, educators, training organisations and our partners, we hope to reach more people than ever before to inspire people of all ages, to seize the opportunities apprenticeships offer during the Week.

The easiest way to support the Week is to do so on social media and encourage everyone you know to do the same with #NAW2018. If you are interested in learning more about apprenticeships or are an existing or former apprentice, there are two key activities during the Week you can get involved with:

Read more.


MPs launch an enquiry into impact of social media.

Are you concerned about the impact social media and screen-use are having on young people? If so, MPs are looking to hear your thoughts.

The Commons Science and Technology Committee has announced an inquiry into the impact of social media and screen-use on young people's health.

The committee says it wants to hear the views of young people themselves, as well as of teachers and youth workers.

Chairman Norman Lamb said it was vital to assess the benefits and risks.

"Social media and smartphones are increasingly being used by children and young people," he said.

"We want to determine the scale of the issues - separating out the understandable concerns from the hard evidence, and to identify what practical measures people are already taking to boost the benefits and blunt the potential harms.

Read more.


Jersey looks to raise funding for students.

The "significant" rise in UK university costs is one of the reasons a British island is looking to increase its funding to students.

It comes as the prime minister has called for better value for students paying tuition fees in England.

Jersey's government said most of its students chose to study in "the most expensive place in Europe", the UK.

The island's chief minister said he did not want potential students to "worry about financing" university.

The plans - due to be debated in April - apply to first undergraduate degrees in Jersey, the UK, or with the Open University and for "recognised qualifications" at universities outside the UK.

Read more.


 

©2002-2015 Association of Christian Teachers. All rights reserved. Use of this website is subject to our Terms & Conditions and Cookie Policy. Click here to read ACT’s Privacy Policy. Click here to read ACT’s Refund Policy. Click here to read ACT’s Electronic Transactions Security Policy. Website by: Serve Design 

ACT Login