ACT - The Association of Christian Teachers

for Christians working in education

The life
A Christian perspective on society and the education industry for the Christian professional in education.

Three in five suffer bullying.

Three in five young people have been victims of bullying in school and nearly a third (30 per cent) have been bullied online, survey suggests. 

The majority of children (53 per cent) say they are worried about experiencing bullying online, research by charity the Diana Award has revealed. 

 

The survey, of more than 1,000 children aged between 11 and 16, found that more than two in three young people find it easier talking about online issues with peers their age than with a teacher

Read more.


Air pollution.

Air pollution could cut seven months off the life span of current primary school pupils

  • King's College London researchers based report on air pollution in Birmingham  
  • Air pollution reduction policies could cost £470million in Birmingham alone
  • Study found that eight-year-old born in 2011 may die seven months early under current pollution projections 

Read more.


School holidays food hunger.

Money, food, childcare and activities are serious anxieties for low-income working families, MPs have been told.

Four mothers came to Westminster on Wednesday to tell a panel of MPs about their struggles to make ends meet over the long summer holidays.

They said holidays, even days out, were out of the question on a tight budget.

"Your mind is constantly thinking about money - money for the children, money for this, money for that," one of the four, Karen, told the MPs.

"You have to manage your money.

 

"Some weeks are worse than others.

"You've got bills coming out and other things and you are literally looking to see if you've got to add more money to a food bill.

"So, it becomes quite stressful, very stressful."

Dawn said: "In the holidays, you're spending more because your child's not in school and you're entitled to the school meals, so you're doing a bigger shop.

"And children need activities - you're spending more that way."

Read more.


Kings College London apologises to students over ban during Royal visit.

King's College London (KCL) has apologised and admitted it was wrong to ban a group of students from campus during a royal visit.

The Queen and the Duchess of Cambridge visited the university's Strand Campus on 19 March to open Bush House.

One staff member and 13 students linked to campaigning groups were denied access to the campus, causing one student to fear he would miss an exam.

The acting principal said KCL's actions that day "did not meet our values".

Prof Evelyn Welch added that a report into the university's actions was "uncomfortable to read" and that the leadership team "apologise wholeheartedly".

 

The investigation found the university had breached its own policies regarding protection of personal information and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Following protests at university events on both 4 March and 18 March, police contacted the university's head of security to express concerns of an "increased risk" during the royal visit.

Read more.


Knife Crime.

England's knife crime strategy focuses too much on punishing the perpetrators and blaming gangs, a former top police officer has said.

Former Met Police superintendent Leroy Logan suggested the Home Office strategy was not fit for purpose.

It failed to take account of the fear and hopelessness some young people felt, with some not expecting to live past the age of 20, he said.

He told the Youth Select Committee only half of knife crime is linked to gangs.

The former superintendent of Hackney, east London, told the committee, made up of members of the Youth Parliament, he wanted to be "real" based on his 30 years of experience.

 

'Not about gangs'

"There's a correlation between violence and drug dealing, there always has been.

"But if you look at the data around knife crime you see that less than half of that crime is due to gangs or gang-related violence.

"So you have to say is the strategy being used by the Home Office and regional governments, like the Mayor of London's Office, and even local governments, is it fit for purpose?

Read more.


Mental health and young people.

Data comes from a survey of over 12,000 young people aged between 11 and 19 carried out by the mental health charity Mind

Three in five young people (59 per cent) have either experienced a mental health problem themselves, or are close to someone who has, according to major new research by Mind that shows the sheer scale of the pressures faced by young people.

The survey from the mental health charity also shows that one in seven (14 per cent) young people say their mental health is currently poor or very poor and outlines the breadth of the challenges they face. It also highlights how secondary schools are promoting and supporting their wellbeing.

Read more.


School holiday poverty.

On Wednesday 3 July 2019 the Work and Pensions Committee and Education Committee will meet together in Parliament to investigate the problems - including hunger – of School holiday poverty, when parents have to find money for more childcare and meals kids are not getting at school. 

Both Committees are aware that school holidays can place additional burdens on families. Low-income parents are at particular risk of experiencing financial difficulties during the holidays, because of extra childcare costs and the absence of free school meals for their children. 

Save the Children and other organisations have raised concerns about the impact that school holidays can have on families on a low income. The APPG on Hunger's Hungry Holidays 2017 report cited research estimating that the loss of free school meals adds between £30 and £40 per week to parents' outgoings during school holidays.

The report also estimated that up to 3 million children are at risk of going hungry in the school holidays—1 million children who receive free school meals during term time, and another 2 million children who are ineligible for free school meals but are growing up in households in in-work poverty

Read more.


Should parent groups be allowed to take over "untouchable schools".

Parent groups should be allowed to take over “untouchable” schools that no one else will sponsor, according to the government-backed free schools charity.

The proposal is one of seven recommendations laid out in a report released by the New Schools Network today to mark its 10th anniversary.

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The idea was branded “a recipe for disaster” by the NEU teaching union.

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France to inroduce smacking ban.

France's parliament will adopt a smacking ban on Tuesday - a largely symbolic gesture in a country where there is still widespread support for corporal punishment against children.

According to France's Childhood Foundation, 85 percent of French parents admit to smacking their children.

If approved by the Senate, France will become the 56th state to prohibit smacking just days after Kosovo passed similar legislation.

The measure, which was adopted by MPs in November, is expected to easily pass France’s upper house of parliament despite some conservative and far-Right members warning such legislation fostered unwanted "interference" in family life.

Read more.


School holidays and money.

Money, food, childcare and activities are serious anxieties for low-income working families, MPs have been told.

Four mothers came to Westminster on Wednesday to tell a panel of MPs about their struggles to make ends meet over the long summer holidays.

They said holidays, even days out, were out of the question on a tight budget.

"Your mind is constantly thinking about money - money for the children, money for this, money for that," one of the four, Karen, told the MPs.

"You have to manage your money.

    

"Some weeks are worse than others.

"You've got bills coming out and other things and you are literally looking to see if you've got to add more money to a food bill.

"So, it becomes quite stressful, very stressful."

Read more.


 

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