ACT - The Association of Christian Teachers

for Christians working in education

The life
A Christian perspective on society and the education industry for the Christian professional in education.

Education Support Partnership.

Teachers Building Society was delighted to donate just over £4500 to the Education Support Partnership this year, which included its annual Charity Saver Account donation.

The Education Support Partnership (Ed Support) is the UK’s only charity providing mental health and wellbeing support services to all education staff and organisations.

The donation included funds from the Teachers Building Society Charity Saver – an account which was set up in 2010 to provide a competitive saving rate for savers whilst at the same time providing valuable help to teachers. Interest from the accounts is donated annually to the Ed Support– the equivalent to 0.25% of all the funds invested.

Teachers Building Society also donated funds towards the Partnerships’ AGM and sponsored an annual mailing for the Ed Support to further support the organisation and all the good work it does in the education sector.

Simon Beresford, Chief Executive for Teachers Building Society, said: “We are proud to make another meaningful donation to the Education Support Partnership. The services offered by the Partnership continue to be invaluable to teachers. As a Building Society founded by teachers for teachers, it’s another important way in which we can support teachers in a world where their wellbeing is often over looked.”

Sarah Goddard, Fundraising Manager at Education Support Partnership said “Thank you so much to Teacher’s Building Society for their annual donation, and further support sponsoring our mailing. In the last year, need for our services have increased by 40% and it is only with the generous support of partners like you that we can meet that demand. Thank you!”

The Charity Saver is now a closed account but ran from 2010 to 2014. Donations continue to be made every year from the invested funds.

You can find out more information about the Education Support Partnership at www.educationsupportpartnership.org.uk


Loneliness strategy.

Loneliness is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time, Theresa May said today as she launched the first cross-Government strategy to tackle it.

The Prime Minister confirmed all GPs in England will be able to refer patients experiencing loneliness to community activities and voluntary services by 2023.

Three quarters of GPs surveyed have said they are seeing between one and five people a day suffering with loneliness, which is linked to a range of damaging health impacts, like heart disease, strokes and Alzheimer’s disease. Around 200,000 older people have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month.

Read more.


Maternity leave support?

Maternity leave: 'Women need more support from schools'             

School leaders need to do more to help women before and after having a baby, argues Charlotte Andrews, and maternity coaching is just one option

Read more.


Getting to children before they are put off University.

Traditionally, universities looking to widen access have focused on secondary aged children preparing to take their next step in education. This is certainly an important moment in a young person’s life, but in many cases it may be too late to shape their decision-making. Universities are looking to solve problems which can become entrenched far earlier in a child’s education.

Read more.


Should children be weighed up to age 18?

Children and young people up to 18 should have their weight and body mass index (BMI) recorded every year, says a report by child health experts.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health says England is falling behind other countries on obesity, mental health and infant deaths.

It predicts rising health problems by 2030 without changes in policy.

An NHS England spokeswoman said the report provided "useful context" for its long-term funding plan.

The plan is set to be published this year.

Read more.


College cuts thwart ambitions.

These six young people are ambitious and determined.

They are an aspiring teacher, a future social worker, a would-be accountant, a budding cardiologist, a wannabe pilot and a veterinary surgeon of tomorrow.

But they fear their dreams, and those of young people like them, may be thwarted by further education funding pressures.

They are all students at New City College in east London, which is closing the doors to its six campuses on Wednesday so staff can join a march against the cuts.

The aspirations of these students are as high as the office blocks of the international banks that provide the backdrop to the Poplar campus where they are based.

Read more.


NEU gives Lighthouse Group contract for members investment advice.

Lighthouse Group has won a new three-year agreement with the National Education Union (NEU) as the preferred provider of retirement planning and investment advice to its 450,000 members.

The NEU was formed on 1 September 2017 by the amalgamation of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) and the National Union of Teachers (NUT) and, while Lighthouse was the preferred supplier of financial advice to the ATL's 126,000 members, it did not previously act for the 336,000 members of the NUT.

Read more.


Referrals to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services up 26%.

The number of referrals to child and adolescent mental health services in England has increased by 26% over the past five years, Education Policy Institute (EPI) research suggests.

Its report also reveals one in four referrals was either rejected or deemed inappropriate for treatment.

Out of 60 providers questioned, 54 gave a response.

The Department of Health said it was investing an additional £1.4bn into mental health services for children.

Read the detail.

The figures, shared with BBC Radio 5 live Investigates, were compiled using Freedom of Information (FOI) requests submitted to child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs) and local authorities in England.

Some providers in England were unable to give the full information requested - 33 supplied data about numbers of referrals over five years.


1 in 3 girls harrassed in school uniform.

One in three girls in the UK has been sexually harassed in public when wearing school uniform, a new report has suggested.

And two-thirds of girls say they have experienced unwanted sexual attention in public, it adds.

The figures come from a report by children's charity Plan International UK, which said many girls feel street harassment is "all part of growing up".

It is calling on bystanders to challenge harassment when they see it.

The charity commissioned an opinion poll by Opinium of 1,000 teenagers and young women aged 14 to 21 across the UK in June 2018, and also carried out interviews with girls and academics.

It found:

  • 66% of girls in the UK said they had experienced unwanted sexual attention or sexual or physical contact in a public place
  • 35% of girls reported receiving unwanted sexual contact such as being touched, groped or grabbed
  • Girls as young as eight years old described witnessing or experiencing harassment
  • More than one in three girls received unwanted sexual attention such as being groped, stared at, catcalled and wolf-whistled while wearing school uniform
  • One-quarter of girls said they had been filmed or photographed by a stranger without permission

Read more.


Coverage of terror attacks leave young people anxious.

Media coverage of terror attacks and extremism can leave young people anxious and with an exaggerated fear of becoming victims, say researchers.

A study of the attitudes of 11 to 16-year-olds found that terrorism was seen as a bigger worry than issues such as bullying, racism, cruelty to children or worries about getting a job.

More than two-thirds expressed fears about the threat of terrorism.

The report suggests that children can have a "skewed" view of levels of risk.

The report, from marketing research firm Childwise, which studies media use among children and young people, found high levels of anxiety about the threat of violence from terror, extremism or warfare.

Read more.


 

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